The Real Pearl Hart - Stagecoach Robber
synopsis (part II)

ACT II:

The townspeople of Tucson mob the train depot to see the captured female bandit accused of committing a very old-fashioned crime. Pearl adopts a phony cowgirl accent and a suffragette stance and delivers the interview that sparks nationwide controversy and front page notoriety. As an awkward night falls in Truman's jail, Pearl and the Sheriff reminisce and are drawn together (Buffalo's Gone sung by Truman with Pearl). He enters her cell. They kiss.

The next morning, Pearl's picture appears on the front page of newspapers from Philadelphia to San Francisco. Pearl is hounded for her autograph as the Press clamors for more. Perusing a paper, Truman finds a list of Roughrider casualties at San Juan Hill. Hart's name is on it, and Truman gently breaks the news. In her grief, Pearl accepts a bottle of Miss Lydia's Tonic from the town drunk, Ed Hogan. When Pearl is visited by Emma Goldman, who is hoping for some stimulating political dialog, Pearl is too drunk to care (Polka Dot Polka sung by Pearl and Emma). Ed then breaks her out of jail so he can be part of her 'gang' (Ed the Notorious sung by Ed and Pearl). Truman catches them in the act and tries to reason with Pearl, but in the end he lets her escape with Ed on his bicycle.

On the lam, Ed suggests that a fiery death is needed to secure Pearl's outlaw legend (Ballad of Pearl Hart sung a capela by Ed). Pearl is recaptured by a lynch mob and Truman and Kate arrive in the nick of time to escort her back for trial. They surprise Pearl by announcing their recent marriage (Gotta Little Piece sung by Kate and Truman). Pearl graciously expresses happiness for both of them.

At trial, Joe Boot is sentenced to 35 years as the infamous Pearl Hart is acquitted by a starstruck jury. An angry Judge rearraigns Pearl on a new charge. While awaiting this verdict (What About Me? sung by Joe, Ed and Truman), Pearl grabs Truman's gun, abetting Ed and Joe escape. Pearl stays behind to face the music.

The Judge gives Pearl five years as Kate sashays to the bench and whispers in his ear, miming a pregnant stomach. Without a secure jail for women, let alone a pregnant one, the Judge releases Pearl with the proviso that she leaves the territory until her sentence expires. The judge asks Pearl to explain herself.

Surreally, Lucy arrives waving a telegram and Truman reads it to the cheering crowd: The Orpheum Theatre in Kansas City offers to stage Lucy's tale of Pearl's exploits on condition Pearl stars. Pearl's reality rapidly morphs into a vaudeville extravaganza featuring all of her friends replete with cancan, rope tricks, elocution and a reenactment of the stagecoach robbery.

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